Recipes

5 Minute Mayo: Secrets for Perfect Homemade Mayonnaise

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog, Fermentation, Recipes | 24 comments

5 Minute Mayo: Secrets for Perfect Homemade Mayonnaise

Making homemade mayonnaise can be a challenging and frustrating process. Learn how to make perfect homemade mayonnaise every time with these tips, tricks, and secrets!

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Hard Apple Cider with Wild Yeast

Posted by on Aug 8, 2013 in Blog, Fermentation, Recipes | 4 comments

Hard Apple Cider with Wild Yeast

My first attempt at homemade hard apple cider with wild yeast has been bottled and is ready for consumption! I started this process several months ago with a gallon of store-bought apple juice in a glass jug. I’m pleased to say that my final product is slightly sweet with a mellow, bubbly finish. Hard cider can be made with either wild yeast or the packaged yeast of your choosing. If you’d like to ensure that your final product is reproducible, go with packaged yeast. I recommend using a champagne yeast like this one! Catching Wild Yeast If you are up for a bit of an adventure, you can make hard cider with wild yeast. The process is quite simple: leave the cider open on the counter, covered lightly with cheesecloth, for several days until some wild yeast finds its way into the bottle. You’ll know that you’re in business because the juice will begin to bubble and fizz. When you can see bubbles rising to the top of the bottle, you know that wild yeast have begun to consume the sugar in your juice and turn it into alcohol. At this point it’s time to cover your bottle with an airlock, which will let the bubbles out, but won’t let anything else in, effectively keeping the brewing environment sterile.  Primary Fermentation Once your cider is fitted with an airlock, the waiting game begins. You’ll see bubbles release quickly at first and eventually more slowly from the jug. After about 2-4 weeks (depending on the temperature in your home), the bubbles will slow and it’ll be time to rack your cider! Racking Racking is a process whereby the cider is siphoned out of the glass jug and into a new vessel (or back into the same vessel after its been cleaned). The purpose of racking is to get rid of the layer of yeast sediment (lees) that has been deposited at the bottom of your fermentation jug. This sediment can give an off-taste to your cider, so it’s best to leave it behind for the next step. Racking is most easy (and also most sterile) when done with a siphon pump and some tubing but can also but done with just the tubing and your mouth. Regardless of the method you choose, this step can be tricky, so I recommend doing some research first. Here are a couple of links to get you started: The Kitchn: Siphoning Home-Brewed Beer Wikihow: Make a Siphon Making Hard Cider Secondary Fermentation Once the cider is siphoned into a second container with the lees, or dead yeast sediment left behind, it will begin its secondary fermentation. If you’d like a still (uncarbonated), dry cider like I did this process will last longer. For me, it took approximately 4 to 5 months. If you want a fizzy, sweeter cider, you can bottle your cider at any point in the brewing process. Bottling When your cider has stopped releasing carbon dioxide bubbles, signifying the slowing of the fermentation process, it’s ready to be bottled! Use that trusty siphon to, that’s right, siphon the cider into flip-top-style bottles. You can also use a funnel and pour the cider but you run the risk of dredging up all the sediment that will have settled at the bottom of your jug and wondering if you should have caved and bought yourself a siphon. I won’t tell you which way I chose to do this. After its been bottled, store your cider in the fridge and enjoy! Your friends are sure to be impressed, and if they are anything like...

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Probiotic Pickles: A Fermented Year-Round Recipe

Posted by on Jul 28, 2013 in Blog, Fermentation, Recipes | 38 comments

Probiotic Pickles: A Fermented Year-Round Recipe

There’s nothing quite like a lacto-fermented half sour pickle! They are crisp, crunchy, and refreshing with just the right amount of tang! Plus they pack a hefty probiotic punch! It’s a win-win.

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Cucumber Lemon Water: The Perfect Antidote to Hot Summer Days

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Blog, Recipes | 5 comments

Cucumber Lemon Water: The Perfect Antidote to Hot Summer Days

In an effort to stay hydrated in the dry heat of Colorado summers, I’ve started to get creative with my water intake approach: enter Cucumber Lemon Water. Cucumber water is simple, takes about 5 minutes to make, and will definitely perk up your hydration regimen. When my water tastes and feels special, I notice I’m much more likely to drink it. So not only do I stay cooler and more hydrated, but I feel like I’m doing something special for myself in just a few minutes a week. If you haven’t tried cucumber lemon water, it doesn’t get much easier. You’ll need: 1 organic, unwaxed cucumber 1 organic lemon A pitcher or mason jar (even a drinking glass works in a pinch!) Choosing Fruits I recommend choosing organic cucumbers and lemons since they will soak in the water and continue to impart their refreshing flavor over the course of several days. If you don’t have access to organic varieties, you can peel the cucumber and simply squeeze the lemon juice into the water without leaving the rind in to soak. The Process is Simple: Start by thinly slicing the washed cucumber and lemon. For a 1 quart container, I used a third of a large cucumber and a half of a lemon, but experiment to see what you like. Place the sliced fruits in your pitcher or jar and cover with cold water. Place your cucumber lemon water in the fridge for a 5 to 10 minutes and it’s ready to drink! That was easy! You can continue refilling your pitcher with water over the course of several days, leaving in the cucumber and lemon slices. The cucumber and lemon will continue to impart their flavor to the water. Depending on how much water you drink, you may find that the cucumber and lemon slices last 3 days or more! When they start to look translucent, are no longer floating, or your water is not getting the flavor you desire, remove the old cucumber and lemon and add some fresh slices! Keep this process going all summer and you’re sure to be cool, refreshed, hydrated, and...

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Tamari Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Posted by on Jun 14, 2013 in Blog, Recipes | 3 comments

Tamari Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Tamari roasted pumpkin seeds are one of my favorite savory snacks. They can be prepared in 5 minutes and are super healthy. Pumpkin seeds are full of B vitamins as well as vitamins E and K. They provide minerals like phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, iron, copper, and zinc to the diet. They are also a good source of protein and contain tryptophan, which helps promote good sleep and lessens depression. Pumpkin seeds can be eaten raw (and I often do) but they are also excellent when pan roasted with tamari (a.k.a. soy sauce). Once roasted, I like adding them to salads, sprinkling them on greens and grains, or just eating them straight. I will say that they are particularly tasty when eaten as a movie snack instead of (or in addition to!) popcorn. Making them is simple and requires only 3 ingredients: raw hulled pumpkin seeds (I use organic), tamari (I use organic and gluten-free), and oil (I use coconut oil, and that’s right, organic). Here’s how to make them: Print Tamari Roasted Pumpkin Seeds Author: CreativeSimpleLife.com Cuisine: Gluten-Free Cook time:  5 mins Total time:  5 mins Serves: 2-4   Ingredients 1 tsp Coconut Oil ½ cup Organic Hulled Pumpkin Seeds 1 tsp Tamari Instructions Melt the oil in a cast iron pan over medium low heat. Add the pumpkin seeds, stirring frequently to allow even cooking. The seeds will start to hiss, sizzle, and crack. After 3-4 minutes of gentle sizzling, remove the pan from the heat. Add tamari and stir vigorously to coat evenly. Allow to cool for a few minutes before serving. 3.2.1246 A few tips: Once the first few seeds start to brown, it’s time to remove the pan from the heat. Use cast iron if you have it. Here’s the one I use. The seeds will not be brown when you turn off the heat. They also won’t crisp up until they’ve cooled, so your typical taste test doesn’t work the same way with this recipe. When in doubt, err on the underdone side. These can be dry roasted in the oven without oil if you prefer. Enjoy! Here’s what I...

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Matsoni: Why Mesophilic Yogurt is the Easiest to Make

Posted by on Jun 2, 2013 in Blog, Fermentation, Recipes | 14 comments

Matsoni: Why Mesophilic Yogurt is the Easiest to Make

Matsoni is one of many heirloom-variety mesophilic yogurt cultures available today. It is valued for its ability to turn milk into yogurt at room temperature without any fancy equipment. Furthermore, you can reuse the same culture for weeks, months, or even years!

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Making & Using Herbal Infused Oils: Calendula & Olive Oil

Posted by on May 27, 2013 in Blog, DIY Beauty, Recipes | 7 comments

Making & Using Herbal Infused Oils: Calendula & Olive Oil

Herbal infused oils make a wonderful addition to homemade skincare products, massage oil, or a hot bath. Learn how to make your own homemade herbal infused oils and read about how to use them!

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Brewing Dandelion Wine & Eating Dandelions

Posted by on May 22, 2013 in Blog, Fermentation, Recipes | 4 comments

Brewing Dandelion Wine & Eating Dandelions

The dandelion is special in that all of its parts are edible: leaves, flowers, and roots! Full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, the dandelion could easily be considered a super-food! Learn how to brew dandelion wine and several different ways to prepare and eat this nutrient-dense plant!

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